Oklahoma Turns Against APUSH?

Brecheen Saving America

Oh Senator, you certainly do manage to stay colorful, don't you?

In case you don't recall, Senator Brecheen was the figure kind enough to spend 10 minutes on the floor being shocked that somewhere deep in Appendix G of the Common Core standards, among a few hundred various books, poems, and documents cited as examples of different reading levels, Toni Morrison has written a dirty book.

The only logical solution is to read it on the floor, complete with gasps and euphemisms mostly made up of first initials and the word "word" - "N-word", "A-word", "K-word", etc. Therefore, Common Core was all about promoting rape and sodomy and undercutting American values. His solution was quote Elijah from the Old Testament, who insisted the impure be chased down and executed by sword.

Needless to say, our repeal of Common Core may have saved many lives.

Now he's after AP-USH, no doubt mostly because we're tired of Texas having all the fun and looking the craziest. Here's the text of SB650 as he's proposed it, although it was no easy task hunting it down. I don't know how OkEd and Swisher do this full time.

STATE OF OKLAHOMA

1st Session of the 55th Legislature (2015)

SENATE BILL 650

An Act relating to schools; prohibiting state funds from being used to support certain U.S. history courses; prohibiting the State Board of Education from awarding certain grants until certain course framework reverts to framework in place at certain time; directing the State Board of Education by certain date to adopt certain history program; establishing criteria for program; allowing display of certain grade-level documents; providing for codification; providing an effective date; and declaring an emergency.

BE IT ENACTED BY THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA:

SECTION 1.     NEW LAW     A new section of law to be codified in the Oklahoma Statutes as Section 1210.704 of Title 70, unless there is created a duplication in numbering, reads as follows:

A.  No state funds shall be used to support advanced placement U.S. history courses in Oklahoma schools as the courses are designed as of the effective date of this act.

B.  Beginning with the 2015-2016 school year, the State Board of Education shall not award any grants to school districts or make any expenditure of state funds, as authorized by Section 1210.703 of Title 70 of the Oklahoma Statutes, for equipment, instructional materials, course development, professional development or training, examination awards or examination scholarships for advanced placement U.S. history courses until the framework for the course is changed and reverts back to the course framework and examination that were used prior to the 2014-2015 school year.

C.  Prior to the 2015-2016 school year, the State Board of Education shall identify and adopt an advanced placement U.S. history program and corresponding assessment that:

1.  Are not in contradiction with the subject matter standards for U.S. history adopted by the State Board of Education; and

2.  Include the following foundational and historical documents as part of the primary instruction in any U.S. history, honors U.S. history, and advanced placement U.S. history course offered in Oklahoma public schools:

a. organic documents from the pre-Colonial, Colonial, Revolutionary, Federalist, and post-Federalist eras of the United States,

b. major principles in the Federalist Papers,

c. the writings, speeches, documents, and proclamations of the founders and presidents of the United States,

d. America's founding documents that contributed to the foundation or maintenance of America's representative form of limited government, free-market economic system, and American exceptionalism,

e. objects of historical significance that have formed and influenced the United States' legal or governmental system and that exemplify the development of the rule of law, including but not limited to the Magna Carta, the Mecklenburg Declaration, the Ten Commandments, and the Justinian Code,

f. U.S. Supreme Court decisions,

g. acts of U.S. Congress, including the published text of the Congressional Record,

h. United States treaties, and

i. other documents, writings, speeches, proclamations, or records relating to the history, heritage, or foundation of the United States, including, in whole, but not limited to:

(1) the Declaration of Independence,

(2) the U.S. Constitution and its amendments,

(3) the Mayflower Compact,

(4) the Bill of Rights,

(5) the Articles of Confederation,

(6) the Virginia Plan,

(7) the Northwest Ordinance,

(8) the motto of the United States,

(9) the National Anthem,

(10) the sermon known as "Model of Christian Charity" by John Winthrop,

(11) the sermon known as "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" by Jonathan Edwards,

(12) "Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death" speech by Patrick Henry,

(13) "Remember the Ladies" letter by Abigail Adams,

(14) the writing "Common Sense, Section III: Thoughts on the Present State of American Affairs" by Thomas Paine,

(15) the essay "Federalist Paper No. 10" by James Madison,

(16) George Washington's farewell address,

(17) Monroe Doctrine,

(18) at least a complete overview of the book entitled "Democracy in America" by Alexis de Tocqueville,

(19) the document known as "Declaration of Sentiments" by Elizabeth Cady Stanton,

(20) Independence Day Speech at Rochester by Frederick Douglass,

(21) "House Divided" speech by Abraham Lincoln,

(22) the "Gettysburg Address" by Abraham Lincoln,

(23) the Second Inaugural Address by Abraham Lincoln,

(24) the "Surrender Speech" by Chief Joseph,

(25) the poem entitled "The New Colossus" by Emma Lazarus,

(26) "The Gospel of Wealth" by Andrew Carnegie,

(27) "The Significance of the Frontier in American History" by Frederick Jackson Turner,

(28) the "Atlanta Compromise" speech by Booker T. Washington,

(29) the "Cross of Gold" speech by William Jennings Bryan,

(30) Roosevelt Corollary by Theodore Roosevelt,

(31) "New Nationalism" speech by Theodore Roosevelt,

(32) "Peace Without Victory" speech by Woodrow Wilson,

(33) First Inauguration Address by Franklin D. Roosevelt,

(34) portions of the book entitled "The Grapes of Wrath" by John Steinbeck,

(35) "The Four Freedoms" speech by Franklin D. Roosevelt,

(36) "Day of Infamy" speech by Franklin D. Roosevelt,

(37) "The Sources of Soviet Conduct" by George Kennan,

(39) the address that became known as the "Truman Doctrine" made by Harry S. Truman,

(40) Address on Little Rock by Dwight Eisenhower,

(41) Farewell Address by Dwight Eisenhower,

(42) Inaugural Address by John F. Kennedy,

(43) "The Decision to Go to the Moon" speech by John F. Kennedy;

(44) "Letter From Birmingham Jail" by Martin Luther King, Jr.,

(45) "I Have a Dream" speech by Martin Luther King, Jr.,

(46) "The Ballot or the Bullet" speech by Malcolm X,

(47) "Great Society" speech by Lyndon B. Johnson,

(48) "The American Promise" speech by Lyndon B. Johnson,

(49) First Inaugural Address by Ronald Reagan,

(50) "40th Anniversary of D-Day" speech by Ronald Reagan,

(51) "Remarks at the Brandenburg Gate" speech by Ronald Reagan; and

(52) the address to the nation speech made on September 11, 2001, by George W. Bush.

School districts shall permit teachers to display grade-level appropriate excerpts from or copies of the documents, writings, speeches, proclamations or records listed in this subsection in school classrooms and school building common areas as appropriate.

SECTION 2.  This act shall become effective July 1, 2015.

SECTION 3.  It being immediately necessary for the preservation of the public peace, health and safety, an emergency is hereby declared to exist, by reason whereof this act shall take effect and be in full force from and after its passage and approval.

55-1-396 EB 1/27/2015 3:31:09 PM

This deserves commentary by those much smarter than myself, although I'll of course rant about this more soon. My favorite part is that getting these documents and the accompanying silliness into law is "immediately necessary for the preservation of public peace, health and safety."

That's right folks, funding be damned - THIS is an EMERGENCY. 

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Comments

Wow. Times have changed. When i took US history in the mid-80s, we never made it through WWII, let alone read JFK, MLK, or Reagan speeches. I think Brecheen should be given the opportunity to teach this course as he envisions it. Full-time, at the pay rate of a starting teacher.

The other states thank all the states that want to make sure their young people are ill-educated. That means more jobs for kids in educated states. http://www.assignmentland.co.uk/buy-assignment-online

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